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Details are being released of the people whose lives were lost in the July Fourth shooting at a parade in suburban Chicago. Two of the victims left behind a 2-year-old son. Another was staying with family in Illinois after he was injured in car wreck. For some, it was a tradition. They were avid travelers, members of their synagogue and professionals. But in a hail of gunfire they became victims in the nation's latest horrific mass shooting. The victims are 37-year-old Kevin McCarthy and his wife, Irina; 64-year-old Katherine Goldstein; 88-year-old Stephen Straus; 63-year-old Jacquelyn Sundheim; 78-year-old Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza; and 69-year-old Eduardo Uvaldo.

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News outlets are reporting that several law enforcement authorities shot a man on a federal highway in West Virginia. Video of Wednesday's shooting is circulating on social media. Authorities have not released any details or responded to requests for more information. The footage shows the man walking onto the four-lane freeway near the city of Beckley while holding what looks like a handgun. At least a half-dozen law enforcement officers are in pursuit with their guns drawn. The man alternately points the object in his hand at his head and raises it in the air several times before he is shot.

A Detroit police officer and a suspect have been fatally shot on the city’s west side. Detroit police Chief James White said the officer and his partner responded about 7:30 p.m. Wednesday to a call of a man firing a weapon. He said when the officers arrived, they were met by the suspect who was armed with an assault-type weapon and firing in their direction. White said one officer was struck and his partner returned fire, fatally striking the suspect. The struck officer was later pronounced dead at a hospital. The officer killed was not immediately identified but White said he was a five-year veteran with the department and “comes from a long history of law enforcement officers.”

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An inquest jury has determined that two Seattle police officers were justified in fatally shooting a mentally unstable, pregnant, Black mother of four children inside her apartment when she menaced them with knives. The six King County jurors issued their findings Wednesday in the 2017 death of Charleena Lyles. The officers testified that Lyles, who had recently threatened other officers with shears, had been calmly speaking with them when she suddenly lunged at one with a knife. They repeatedly yelled for her to get back before firing. Her family questioned why the officers did not use less-lethal options when they knew she had mental health issues.

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The man charged with killing seven people at an Independence Day parade confessed to police that he unleashed a hail of bullets from a rooftop in suburban Chicago and then fled to the Madison, Wisconsin, area, where he contemplated shooting up an event there. That's according to authorities who spoke Wednesday. Robert Crimo III turned back to Illinois, where he was later arrested after deciding he was not prepared to pull off a shooting in Wisconsin. An Illinois judge ordered Crimo to be held without bail. A prosecutor said police found the shells of 83 bullets and three ammunition magazines on the rooftop that he fired from.

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Jurors have found a 32-year-old man guilty of first-degree murder for the 2019 fatal shooting of rapper Nipsey Hussle. The Los Angeles County jury reached its verdict in the trial of Eric R. Holder Jr. on Wednesday. The verdict brings an end to a legal saga that has lasted more than three years and a trial that was often delayed because of the pandemic. Holder and Hussle had known each other for years when a chance meeting outside the Grammy-winning rapper’s Los Angeles clothing store led to the shooting, and Hussle's death. Holder could get life in prison when he’s sentenced on Sept. 15.

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In the midst of the chaos of a Chicago-area parade massacre, a woman walked up to Greg Ring and handed him a 2-year-old boy, covered in blood. Ring took the child, who was crying for his mom and dad, to a fire station, where he was asked to keep him, while authorities tried to deal with the shooter. The family drove to Ring’s in-laws' home, where the boy sat with Ring’s 4-year-old, watching a Mickey Mouse show. It wasn’t until later they were able to identify him and reunite him with his grandparents. Aiden McCarthy’s parents, Kevin and Irina, both died in the shooting, which killed seven people and wounded more than two dozen others.

Days after a rooftop gunman killed seven people at a parade, attention has turned to how the assailant obtained multiple guns and whether the laws on Illinois books could have prevented the Independence Day massacre. Illinois gun laws are generally praised by gun-control advocates as tougher than in most states. But they did not stop Robert E. Crimo III from carrying out the attack in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park. One focus is on the state’s so-called red-flag law, which is intended to temporarily take away guns away from people with potentially violent behavior. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia have such laws.

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A new report on the Uvalde elementary school massacre in Texas says a police officer had a chance to open fire on the gunman but missed it while waiting for permission to shoot. The report also says some of the 21 victims at Robb Elementary School likely “could have been saved” on May 24 had they received medical attention sooner. The report is yet another damning assessment of how police failed to act on opportunities that might have saved lives in what became the deadliest school shooting in the U.S. since the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in 2012.

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Police in Richmond, Virginia, say they thwarted a planned Fourth of July mass shooting after receiving a tip that led to arrests and the seizure of multiple guns. Police announced the alleged plot Wednesday. Chief Gerald Smith says the investigation began after a call from a “hero citizen.” He says that citizen learned of plans for an attack on an Independence Day celebration and reported it to police. Authorities have arrested two men on firearms charges. The announcement comes days after a violent attack on a July Fourth parade in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park that killed seven people and injured dozens.

Prosecutors and attorneys for Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz are battling over whether jurors at his upcoming penalty trial should learn about the swastikas carved on his gun's magazines. They also argued Wednesday over whether his racist, homophobic and threatening online postings, his computer searches for child pornography and cruelty to animals should be admitted as evidence. Judge Elizabeth Scherer said she will rule before the trial starts July 18. Cruz pleaded guilty in October to murdering 17 at Parkland's Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in 2018. The trial will decide where the 23-year-old former Stoneman Douglas student will be sentenced to death or life without parole.

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Prosecutors say a 23-year-old Indianapolis man has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for fatally shooting a U.S. Postal Service mail carrier. They say Tony Cushingberry entered the plea in the April 27, 2020, slaying of 45-year-old mail carrier Angela Summers in Indianapolis. Court documents say Cushingberry was upset about the lack of mail delivery to his home because of an aggressive dog. Cushingberry pursued Summers onto a neighbor’s porch, causing Summers to reach for her can of defensive spray, and spray Cushingberry. Cushingberry took out a handgun from his waistband and shot Summers in the chest. Summers collapsed and was pronounced dead at a hospital.

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Over a year after Colorado was rocked by a shooting that left 10 people dead at a supermarket, one county is proposing local gun control ordinances that go far beyond state and federal law. With gun control bills facing opposition in many statehouses and Congress, the Democratic bastion of Boulder County may soon join several other municipalities taking gun control into their own hands. The measures include limiting magazine capacity to 10 rounds, extending the waiting period for gun purchases from three to 10 days, banning guns in many public places and raising the minimum purchasing age to 21.

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Police say bullets that grazed two police officers during a Fourth of July fireworks show in Philadelphia and prompted an evacuation of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway likely were fired from far away. Chief Inspector Frank Vanore of the Philadelphia Police Department told reporters Wednesday that one .40 caliber round “probably coming in a downward direction” hit the top of an officer’s hat. At about the same time Monday night, an officer about 20 feet away was cut on the shoulder by a round from the same gun. Vanore said they could have been fired from a mile or more away. No arrests have been announced.

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A driver accused of shooting at police officers during a long car chase through the streets of New York's second-largest city has been arraigned on five counts of attempted murder. The wild March 29 chase in Buffalo resulted in three officers and suspect Kente Bell being struck. A prosecutor says two of the officers were hit by friendly fire. The prosecutor says Bell is partially paralyzed and drove a vehicle that did not require him to use his feet. A call seeking comment was made to Bell’s attorney. The prosecutor says there will be no criminal proceedings against the officers.

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A man has pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison for a botched robbery that ended with the fatal shooting of an undercover Cleveland detective and his informant. Prosecutors say 19-year-old Kevin Robinson pleaded guilty to two counts each of aggravated murder and robbery. He must serve 28 years of his sentence before he becomes eligible for parole. Robinson was 17 when detective James Skernivitz and informant Scott Dingess were killed in September 2020 while they were in an unmarked car preparing for a drug operation. A group of youths approached them and fired several shots into the vehicle.

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The man accused of opening fire at an Independence Day parade in suburban Chicago legally bought five weapons, including two high-powered rifles. Authorities said Tuesday that the purchases were allowed even though police were called to his home twice in 2019 for threats of violence and suicide. The suspect was charged with seven counts of murder. Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart promised that dozens more charges would be sought and that the man could receive a mandatory life sentence without the possibility of parole. The assailant sprayed more than 70 rounds from a rooftop into a crowd in Highland Park, an affluent community of about 30,000 on the Lake Michigan shore.

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Amid the stream of mass shootings that have become chillingly commonplace in America,  the reality of America’s staggering murder rate can often be seen more clearly in the deaths that never make the national news.  These are seemingly mundane disputes that spin out of control and someone goes for a gun. Often, the victim and the shooter know one another. They are co-workers and acquaintances, siblings and neighbors. They are killed in farming villages, small towns and crowded cities. They are people like David Guess, a 51-year-old small town father of four who had struggled with addiction and who police say was shot by an acquaintance and dumped in the hills of northern Alabama, near a place called Chicken Foot Mountain.

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For many people, the mass shooting that killed at least seven people and injured 30 others in a Chicago suburb on July 4 was yet another reminder that any place, any event in the U.S. can turn dangerous or deadly. Highland Park is one of the country’s safest towns, and July 4th parades among the most American of celebrations. Even before Monday’s killings, some people already were on edge, questioning whether to venture into large gatherings, looking over their shoulders during even the most run-of-the-mill activities, from grocery shopping to going to school or catching a movie.

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The parents of a 2-year-old boy who got lost during the July 4 parade shooting in suburban Chicago are among the seven people who were killed, authorities said as friends and family mourned their lost loved ones. Officials say 37-year-old Kevin McCarthy and 35-year-old Irina McCarthy, 35 were fatally shot while watching the parade in Highland Park, a Chicago suburb. Their son, Aiden, became separated from them in the chaos. Authorities identified four others who died as Katherine Goldstein, 64; Jacquelyn Sundheim, 63; Stephen Straus, 88; and Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza, 78. Every victim was from Highland Park except for Toledo-Zaragoza, who was living with his family in the city but originally came from Morelos, Mexico. Officials haven’t identified the seventh victim.

An inquest jury has started deliberations into the actions of two Seattle police officers who fatally shot a Black pregnant mother in her apartment. The Seattle Times reports the jury will weigh responses of “Yes,” “No,” or “Unknown” to 123 questions relating to the circumstances surrounding the death of Charleena Lyles on June 18, 2017. She was killed after purportedly brandishing a knife at officers who responded to her report of a burglary. Officers Jason Anderson and Steven McNew, who are white, shot her seven times. They testified that Lyles suddenly went from conversational to confrontational, pulling a knife from her pocket and advancing on officers.